Facilitator Profile: Brittany Luby

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Tell us a bit about why you facilitate this program:

I facilitate this program because I truly believe in it and I really want to master the mind shifts and practices it offers. The materials we cover are absolutely the remedy to a lot of my stress and blocks because they encourage digging deep while also zooming out so we can tackle challenges, goals, and forecast holistically. The way this program has changed my approach to business should definitely be shared, and I am thrilled to be a part of an effort that encourages agency, balance, and success!

What are your favorite parts of the program?

The goal planning is probably my favorite because it makes me feel like things are possible. It helps me to brain dump all of the big and little tasks and to-dos, and then actually prioritize them into an actionable and organized game plan. When I am overwhelmed, that visual game plan grounds me and helps me to refocus on what I can accomplish. It’s dreaming big but with boots on the ground.

The goal planning is probably my favorite because it makes me feel like things are possible.
— Brittany

What has most surprised you about your work as a facilitator?

One thing that surprised me was how much I truly enjoyed supporting others professionally. I have been so lucky to work with super intelligent and impressive teammates as well as participants and am grateful for how much mutual support we are able to provide each other. I look forward to continuing to grow in this role and for helping future participants to thrive!

Facilitator Profile: Shannon Byrne

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Tell us a bit about why you facilitate this program:

I believe small businesses play an important role in our ecosystem and economy. I get great joy from supporting those making their dream products or services a reality. I want to use my experience and skills to help the people who are working hard to create work they believe in because they don’t like what else they see in the world. Also, because the program was a game-changer for me and I want to help spread the good word and watch the impact it has on others!

I’ve learned I feel calm and collected and like I can tackle it all with well-built systems and a dashboard for managing my entire life.
— Shannon

What are your favorite parts of the program?

On a personal level, system creation. I can now manage multiple projects (I love it and it works for me) while having a personal life. I’ve learned I feel calm and collected and like I can tackle it all with well-built systems and a dashboard for managing my entire life. In terms of facilitating, I love reading through everyone’s discovery docs and watching them make life-changing realizations in real-time! Hearing their epiphanies is what fuels me.

What has most surprised you about your work as a facilitator?

People’s willingness to be vulnerable with one another. Anchor & Orbit is a truly special safe space.

Facilitator Profile: Devin Pope

Tell us a bit about why you facilitate this program: Because I believe in its philosophy and purpose down to the last detail! As you see on the sales page, I’m a alumni of the program and owe so much of my success and happiness in my work to what I worked through in the assignments, learned in the resources, and discussed in the one-on-one calls.

What are your favorite parts of the program? The Discovery section will always have a special place in my heart because that’s where I was able to get things out of my head and start to make sense of them. My secret favorite part of the program is that the assignments keep growing with me. There is never “done forever,” and I love that. I might get my competitive analysis done to a point that serves me well, but then a month or two later I can go back in and add to it and make new discoveries.

My secret favorite part of the program is that the assignments keep growing with me.
— Devin


What has most surprised you about your work as a facilitator? People’s inability to see their own wealth of knowledge. (And I know I’m like this, too.) A lot of what I do as a facilitator is looking and asking questions. I see people’s goals, and ask questions that the answers to will provide clarity and direction. The answers are alllll the participant’s and have usually been there for some time, they just needed the questions to be asked.

Your Business Questions Answered

Well, some of them, at least — there are a lot of questions.

Recently Anchor & Orbit took questions from The Glossary’s Instagram followers, and here are our more in-depth answers.

How do I not lose making progress toward my big goals?

Your current business (your clients, deadlines, product development, etc) are absolutely a priority. My suggestion is to create a day a week (or a few days a month) that are set aside just for the bigger projects. This is harder than it sounds, of course.

The bigger picture work can be more ambiguous, without a “deadline” or even not as rewarding in the short term. Your past self (and your future self!) are rooting for your present self to step up chip away at long-term goals.

Write out the steps, figure out how long each one might take, calendar the steps and go from there. Knowing that derailing a bigger project means that a completion date gets pushed out can be a huge motivator.

How do I get more clear on my finances?

This is a big one. Let’s start with one task and some suggestions:

  • Figuring out what you need. How much money do you spend or need on a monthly basis?

  • To do this: go through your bank account and credit card statements then categorize your spending. That way there is no way you can lie about what you need or don’t need.

  • I’m not big on people cutting back on what one needs, but are you spending too much on your credit card and unable to pay it back on a monthly basis? That a clue for needing to budget more effectively

  • Saving is an amazing way to feel more clear about your finances and talking to a long-term financial advisor should be at the top of your priorities to get retirement accounts set up

There is so much to say here and not enough time. Start with the above!

Do you have any tips about time management?

I have a ton of things to say about this. When I hear this question from people, the automatic response is “time management” which, really isn’t the solution.

You probably *do* work all of the time! So this is less about time management and more about saying no from the get-go or prioritizing what needs to be done. (easier said than done, right?)

Sometimes you have to be “heads down and focused” which might look like working all the time. But make it temporary and learning how you can recover. It’s a marathon, not a race and recovery is part of being a good runner (I love metaphors).

When my work really starts to get to me, that’s when I know that stepping away isn’t just important but a requirement. I have to take care of my most valuable asset (my brain, my body, ME).

When you take a moment to step away and see the big picture, try to figure out what you can offload to others, systems that you can implement to make your day easier, and most importantly, ways you can manage your time on a daily and weekly basis so you feel less overloaded. This may also mean that you have to adjust your rate and create more value for yourself.

What’s a great resource to set up systems?

AH! Great question. We love systems! We have a great goal resource that will help set up a long-term planning system, which we know people who use it also use that kind of system for other processes in their business.

The book “Getting Things Done” is a great one. We also love reading anything that the Harvard Business Review puts out in regards to streamlining and systems. And of course, our program is all based on systems and discovery :)

Overall, a system is really about how you work. Step away from the stressful day to day to figure out what hurts most in your business. What’s taking too much time? Is there a template or a technology that can help? Don’t forget that your job is to get better at your job. It’s worth dedicating time, energy and money to do your best.

Are business cards obsolete?

I don’t think so! I love giving people my business cards (which were designed by Chelsey Dyer Studio and printed by The Aesthetic Union) and simply having them always seems impressive. I’m all about seamless, not awkward interactions. That way if you’re enjoying a conversation but want to mingle (or run to the bus) you have a tool to create the connection. The card handoff means you get to make a time to get coffee or a drink to connect at another time.

Putting someone’s digits in a phone is very casual (and can be misconstrued as intimate) - it’s nice to have some professional distance even if it is just my mobile number.

What’s most important in the realm of business cards is still old school:

  • Take a business card in return so you can follow up. Don’t leave it to someone else to be the person to reach out first.

  • Have something beautiful, but a standard size

  • Have other, more technologically relevant, assets to go along with it like an updated website so you can be reached easily and have more information about what you do

One more business card tip: When you go to an event, put some cards in an easy to access pocket so you don’t have to dig around your bag to find them.